Mold_Removal Molds produce tiny spores to reproduce. These spores waft through the indoor and outdoor air continually. Once they land on a damp spot indoors, they may begin growing and digesting whatever they are growing on in order to survive. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods. When excessive moisture or water accumulates indoors, mold growth will often occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains undiscovered or un-addressed. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control mold.

 

Toxic Black Mold Allergy, Respiratory Problems & Mold Health Issues

 

 "Molds are usually not a problem indoors, unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing. Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins).

“Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash (dermatitis). Allergic reactions to mold are common. They can be immediate or delayed. Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold.

“In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people. Symptoms other than the allergic and irritant types are not commonly reported as a result of inhaling mold. Research on mold and health effects is ongoing" advises the u.s. environmental protection agency.

“All molds have the potential to cause health effects. Molds can produce allergens that can trigger allergic reactions or even asthma attacks in people allergic to mold. Others are known to produce potent toxins and/or irritants. Potential health concerns are an important reason."

~ The U.S.EPA (march 2001)

 

The EPA warns people that "Most people are aware that outdoor air pollution can damage their health but may not know that indoor air pollution can also have significant effects. EPA studies of human exposure to air pollutants indicate that indoor air levels of many pollutants may be 2-5 times, and occasion more than 100 times, higher than outdoor levels. These levels of indoor air pollutants are of particular concern because it is estimated that most people spend as much as 90% of their time indoors.

In recent years, comparative risk studies performed by EPA and its Science Advisory Board (SAB) have consistently ranked indoor air pollution among the top five environmental risks to public health.

 

"Ninety four percent (94%) of all respiratory ailments are caused by polluted air according to the American medical association, which also reported that one-third of the U.S.A.'s national health bill is for causes directly attributable to indoor air pollution. Adult-onset asthma from workplace mold exposure.”

 

The present [health study] results provide new evidence of the relation between workplace exposure to indoor molds and development of asthma in adulthood.

 

“Our findings suggest that indoor mold problems constitute an important occupational health hazard,” reported the Finnish institute of occupational health, in environmental health perspectives, may, 2002.

 

The Finnish workplace mold study estimated that the percentage of adult-onset asthma attributable to workplace mold exposure to be 35.1%. We were able to find sufficient evidence that certain respiratory problems, including symptoms in asthmatics who are sensitive to mold, are associated with exposure to mold and damp conditions.

Excessive dampness influences whether mold, as well as bacteria, dust mites and other such agents, are present and thrive indoors, the committee noted. In addition, the wetness may cause chemicals and particles to be released from building materials.

A rare ailment known as hypersensitivity pneumonitis also was associated with indoor mold exposure in susceptible people," as reported in the almost 300 page report by the Institute of Medicine [division of U.S. Government's National Academy of Sciences], Tuesday, May 25, 2004. The study was financed by the U.S. Government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Just a few hours of unprotected exposure to elevated levels of airborne mold spores can start mold growing inside one's body, and then possibly require medical intervention to cleanse the body of internal mold growth.

Learn the various unhealthy Mold Species. Sample indoor mold spores with a Certified Mold Inspector.

  

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To schedule a Sacramento mold test or San Francisco Bay Area mold inspection please call 800.411.0840 today.

For home inspection services in the Sacramento and Bay Area please contact Golden State Home Inspections at 800.441.0804 or visit http://www.goldenstatehomeinspections.com 

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